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Tablecraft 119A Single Rangette w/ Chrome Plated Finish, 1500W/120V
$141.90


Polarware 10101-0 Yukon Institutional Drop-In Sink w/ NO Drain Hole
$60.07


Polarware 1014-STAND Pail Stand on Caster Wheels Only
$68.87


Polarware 1020 Adaptor Bar, 20-1/2 in x 3/4, For 19-7/8 x 11-7/8 in Opening
$4.97


Polarware 102-1-2 2-Compartment Stainless Drop-In Sink w/ 2-in Drain
$93.87


Browne Foodservice 2088 Adaptor Bar, for 12 x 20 in Opening
$1.12


Polarware 120-2 12 qt. Stainless Steel Stock Pot Cover
$12.06


Polarware 5015 Thermometer for Stock Pot with Faucet, 0 to 250 degrees F, 4 in Probe
$17.78


Polarware 5019 Replacement Ball Valve for 40 and 60 qt Stock Pots with Faucet, Stainless Steel
$20.94


Polarware 106 Straight Sided Bowl, 36 Oz., Stainless Steel
$9.79



CCTV Security Planning for Restaurants

by Steven Rosstad

Better business control, safety, loss prevention and security will be your gains by adding a Closed Circuit TV system (CCTV) to your restaurant. With ease of operation, unique features, no tapes to change and low cost; CCTV is now a must have for most restaurants. There are four main parts that make up a CCTV system: An (LCD) viewing monitor, a DVR (Digital Video Recorder), cameras, and a matrix camera switching system. Today’s standalone products usually have the switching system built into the DVR to save installation space.

The equipment features I recommend are:

Motion alarm detection: If someone trips the motion sensing camera area, the DVR automatically takes a picture of the incident and emails it to a list of managers.

Remote viewing via the Internet: This feature allows you to watch your restaurant from anywhere in the world. This is also great for multi-unit managers allowing them to monitor more locations in a day without the travel.

Digital information retrieval: This allows you to sync your POS transactions with the video recordings, so you can see both at the same time.

View and record: This allows you to review an incident and still be recording in real-time- all at the same time.

Built in DVD recorder: for back-up archiving.

Good camera placement is critical. These are my recommendations and applications.

The front door: Security, safety and traffic control.

The rear door: Security, verification and loss prevention.

The liquor room: Inventory and loss prevention.

Front door of the office/counting room: Security and loss prevention.

The bar area: Traffic and staff monitoring.

The main dining room: Traffic and staff monitoring.

The kitchen: Loss prevention, staff monitoring.

The parking lot: Safety and security.

POS terminals: Loss prevention and transaction verifications.

Most DVRs can handle up to 16 cameras. This is usually enough for most restaurants.

Larger systems that are PC based can have an unlimited number of cameras, but can be costly. Combination cameras for night and day are good for restaurants because many restaurants change the lighting mood at different times of the day and need cameras with low light sensitivity. Cameras should be placed high when possible to prevent vandalism, and if that is not possible, order cameras with security housings. Outdoor cameras may need heating and fan elements in them including a rain blower to receive clear images during poor weather conditions.

Another application of a CCTV system is using live camera feeds as a marketing tool on your website.

Steven Rosstad is the president of Steven Rosstad Audio + Video Consulting.

(800) 769-0731

www.audiovideoconsultant.com






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